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  • Wyoming Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Wyoming statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Wyoming labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: Wyoming Department of Workforce Services Wyoming DOWS Employer Page Required Wyoming Workplace Posters Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employers may establish a policy that denies payment for accrued vacation time upon separation from employment. Employers may require employees to be employed on a specific date before they receive their vacation leave allotment.  Employers can implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy that requires employees to use their leave by a certain date, as long as a reasonable amount of time is given.  Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay employees for time spent responding to a jury summons but are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: Employers are required to provide 1 hour of paid leave to vote if employees do not have at least 3 consecutive off-duty hours in which to vote.   Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck Employees who separate from employment for any reason (including terminations, resignations and layoffs)… Read more »
  • West Virginia Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know 
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important West Virginia statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few West Virginia labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: West Virginia Division of Labor WVDOL Fact Sheets Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employers may establish a policy that denies payment for accrued vacation time upon separation from employment. Employers may also cap the amount of vacation time that can be accrued, and can implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy that requires employees to use their leave by a certain date. Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay employees for time spent on jury duty, but must excuse them for the days required in serving as a juror if they have proof of the summons on the next day after the summons.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.   Voting Leave:  Employers must provide up to 3 hours of paid leave to vote as long as the employee has requested the time off in writing 3 days before the day of the vote.  If the employee has enough time outside of their shifts to vote, they do not need to be provided with paid leave.  Bereavement Leave:… Read more »
  • Vermont Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Vermont statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Vermont labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: Vermont Department of Labor Vermont Business Start-Up Guide Leave Sick Days: Employers are required to provide eligible employees one hour of paid sick leave for every 52 hours worked.  Accrual may be capped to 40 hours in a 12-month period.  Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay employees for time spent on jury duty, but may not penalize the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: No statute.   Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck Employees who are terminated or laid off must be paid all final wages within 72 hours of the discharge.  Employees who quit must be paid all final wages by the next regularly scheduled payday. If there is no established payday, they must be paid by the following Friday. Minimum Wage The current minimum wage in Vermont is $10.78.  The state minimum wage is to be reviewed every year and increased by 5 percent or the percentage increase of the Consumer Price Index, whichever is smaller.  Tipped Wages The minimum wage for tipped employees is $5.39.  The tipped minimum wage is to be adjusted by… Read more »
  • South Carolina Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important South Carolina statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few South Carolina labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: South Carolina Department of Employment & Workforce SCDEW Employers Page Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employers may establish a policy that denies payment for accrued vacation time upon separation from employment. Employers may also cap the amount of vacation time that can be accrued, and can implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy that requires employees to use their leave by a certain date. Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay employees for time spent responding to a jury summons but are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: No statute.  Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck Employees who are terminated or laid off must be paid all final wages within 48 hours of their discharge. There is no statute regarding when an employee who resigns must be paid.  Minimum Wage There is no state minimum wage rate in South Carolina, so the federal rate of $7.25 applies.  Tipped Wages There… Read more »
  • Rhode Island Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Rhode Island statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Rhode Island labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: State of Rhode Island Department of Labor & Training RI Employer Handbook + Digest of Labor Laws Leave Sick Days: The Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act requires employers with at least 18 employees to allow employees to accrue one hour of paid sick and safe leave for every 35 hours worked, or paid time off up to a maximum of 32 hours in 2019, and a maximum of 40 hours in the years that follow.  Medical Leave: The Rhode Island Parental and Family Medical Leave Act requires employers with more than 50 employees to grant an unpaid leave of absence of 13 weeks in any two calendar years for the following reasons: The birth of a child The adoption of a child 16 years of age or younger A serious illness of an employee or their parent, spouse, child, mother-in-law, or father-in-law  Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation time but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employees who have been with the business for at least one year must be paid for any vacation time accrued in accordance with implemented policy by the next regularly scheduled payday after separation from employment.  Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay an employee for time taken to respond to a jury summons, but they are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Employers are required to pay a rate of 1 ½ times… Read more »
  • Tennessee Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know 
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Tennessee statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Tennessee labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development TDLWD Employer Training Page Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employers may establish a policy that denies payment for accrued vacation time upon separation from employment. Employers may also cap the amount of vacation time that can be accrued, and can implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy that requires employees to use their leave by a certain date. Jury Duty: Employers with 5 or more employees are required to pay permanent employees for time spent on jury duty and are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  If an employee is scheduled for a night shift or during the hours before the time court is normally held, the employee must be excused from work for the shift immediately preceding the employee’s first day of jury duty.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave:  Employers must give eligible employees (those who request the time off by 12 p.m. on the day prior to the vote and who do not have 3 hours… Read more »
  • North Dakota Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important North Dakota statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few North Dakota labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: North Dakota Department of Labor Required North Dakota Workplace Posters  Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave, but must comply with any established policy or contract. Employers can’t require employees to forfeit any accrued vacation leave upon separation from employment, regardless of the reason.  Employers can cap the amount of vacation leave an employee can accrue.  Employers can implement a “use-it-or-lose-it” policy that requires employees to use their leave by a certain date.  Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay an employee for time taken to respond to a jury summons, but they are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: State law “encourages” employers to allow employees to take time off to  vote if their work schedules conflict with voting poll times. Still, there is no guaranteed right to the time off.  Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck All employees who separate from employment, no matter the reason, must be paid all final wages no later than the regular payday the wages would… Read more »
  • New Hampshire Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important New Hampshire statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few New Hampshire labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: New Hampshire Department of Labor Mandatory New Hampshire Workplace Posters   Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: No statute.  Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay employees for time taken to serve on a jury or respond to a jury summons, but employees may not be punished in any way for doing so.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: No statute.    Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck Employees who are terminated or who quit must be paid final wages within 72 hours. If an employee who quits does not give at least one pay period’s notice of their resignation, they must be paid by the next regular payday.  Employees who are laid off or who resign due to a labor dispute must be paid by the next regular payday.  Minimum Wage The current minimum wage in New Hampshire is $7.25. It is set to be the same as the federal rate.  Tipped Wages The minimum wage for tipped employees is $3.27.  Employers are not allowed to require employees to participate in a tip pooling or sharing agreement.  Child Labor Minors 14 and… Read more »
  • Nebraska Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Nebraska statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Nebraska labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: Nebraska Department of Labor Nebraska Small Business Training Center  Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Employers can set certain guidelines that employees must meet before they can accrue vacation leave. Once employees earn vacation leave, they cannot be denied a payout for the leave upon separation from employment.  The amount of vacation leave accrued over time may be reasonably capped in the policy. A “use-it-or-lose-it” policy requiring employees to use their leave by a certain time may not be established.  Jury Duty: Employers must pay employees for the time they take off from work to serve on a jury.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave:  Employees who do not have 2 hours while off work to vote are entitled to up to 2 hours paid leave to do so. As long as the employee gives notice in advance of election day, their pay cannot be deducted.  Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck Employees who are terminated, who quit or who… Read more »
  • Montana Employment Laws Business Owners Should Know
    It’s important to stay up to date on all of the employment laws in your state so that you can maintain compliance in your business. We did some of the hard work for you and put some of the most important Montana statutes in one place so you can either learn them for the first time or give yourself a refresher.  However, remember that our summary is not qualified legal advice, laws are always subject to change, and they can vary from municipality to municipality.  It’s up to you to make sure you’re compliant with all laws and statutes in your area. Consult with a qualified lawyer and/or your local government agencies if you have questions or concerns.  Here are a few Montana labor laws every small business owner should know. Resources First, here are a few helpful links and resources for you to bookmark and refer back to: Montana Department of Labor & Industry Montana Labor Law Page  Leave Sick Days: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. Medical Leave: Employers may be required to provide an employee unpaid leave in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act or other federal laws. Vacation Leave: Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid vacation leave but must comply with their own established policies if they choose to implement one. If an employee accrues vacation leave, it cannot  be taken away for any reason and must be paid out for the leave upon separation from employment, regardless of the reason.  The amount of vacation leave accrued over time may be reasonably capped in the policy. Jury Duty: Employers are not required to pay an employee for time taken to respond to a jury summons, but they are not allowed to punish the employee in any way.  Holiday Leave: Private employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid time off for holidays.  Voting Leave: No statute. Bereavement Leave: Employers are not required to provide bereavement leave. Final Paycheck If an employee is terminated or laid off, they must be paid all final wages immediately upon separation unless there is a written policy that extends the payment to the next regular payday or within 15 days, whichever comes first.  Employees who quit or resign due to a labor dispute must be paid all… Read more »
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